Aboriginal Art for Civiq Water Stations

Aboriginal Artist, Luke Penrith

Aboriginal Artist, Luke Penrith, Collaborates with Civiq to Deliver Art for Drinking Fountains.  

Have you ever considered adding Aboriginal art to a water bottle refill station or drinking fountain? Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ value to water is sacred and deep. And it is necessary for survival. It is protected by Lore. Lore (or ‘Law’)  provides a system of sustainable management of water. This in turn ensures healthy people.

In this post, we talk about the collaboration between Civiq and Aboriginal Artist, Luke Penrith. Luke designed 3 pieces of Aboriginal art for Civiq. The designs can be applied to any Civiq hydration station

Aboriginal Art is equally at home, in galleries and public spaces. Aboriginal Art reflects the earliest period of the longest surviving culture in human history. Firstly, it is a means of cultural expression. Similarly, it is a vehicle for the maintenance and transmission of culture. In addition, it is used to promote health and well-being.  

In summary, Aboriginal art is incredibly special and important. 

Aboriginal artist Luke Penrith at work in his studio
Aboriginal artist Luke Penrith at work in his studio

The location and presence of water in Aboriginal art  

One of the great recurring stories in Aboriginal art is the location and presence of water.  

Have you been thinking of adding Aboriginal Art to your water station? You are not alone. We receive many requests from clients wanting to feature authentic Aboriginal art on the water stations. As a result, Civiq has partnered with Luke Penrith, a passionate, proud Aboriginal artist. 

Luke’s ancestry is connected through the Wiradjuri, Wotjobaluk, the Yuin and the Gumbaynggirr Nation. Currently,  he lives and works on Wiradjuri Country, his great grandmother’s Country, in Central NSW.

Aboriginal art, created by Luke Penrith for Civiq Drinking Water Stations artwork panel
Aboriginal art, created by Luke Penrith for Civiq

Contemporary Aboriginal art for hydration stations 

Luke’s artwork is modern contemporary. He paints on canvas. He then transfers his designs to many different mediums. For example, his work is featured on home décor, and sporting-active wear. Likewise, his art is now also featured on drinking water stations. In summary, Luke believes working in a single medium restricts his artistic process as each idea manifests its own individual style. 

Celebrate Aboriginal art at your school, in your council area or at your next project 

The team at Civiq is excited to present schools, councils, water authorities and architects with these new artwork options. Imagine featuring authentic Aboriginal artwork on your new drinking water station! It is a wonderful way to celebrate Aboriginal art, heritage, and culture. 

Luke created three pieces of art on canvas to use on hydration stations. After completion, the artworks are digitised.  This way, they can be printed in different shapes and sizes. After printing, they are applied to any water bottle refill station or drinking fountain that Civiq manufactures, right here, in Australia.  

Civiq staff holding the Aboriginal art, created by Luke Penrith for Civiq Drinking Fountain. From left to right: Evelyn Prooper, Gail Warrington and Kim Butler
Connections and journeys, created by Luke Penrith for Civiq

Luke Penrith’s Exclusive Collaboration for Civiq is titled “Connections and Journeys”

Each artwork is themed with the Connection and the Healing of Country in mind. Keep reading to learn the unique story behind each one. 

Plains & Fresh Water Aboriginal Art (Earth colours) 

The brown, earth-coloured artwork represent Fresh Water people, of inland communities. It shows their special bonds with the rivers, creeks, swamps, and finally, water holes.  

First Nation people utilise freshwater ways to access drinking water, fish, birds, and plants. They hunt close to the water, catching kangaroos or emus when animals pause to get a drink. Many ceremonies and gatherings are held alongside the waterways in the bush. 

Danielle Thompson of Civiq holding one of the aboriginal art (earth color), created by Luke Penrith
Plains & Fresh Water Aboriginal Art (Earth colours)

Saltwater & The Coastline Aboriginal Art (Blue Colours) 

The blue coloured artwork is about Salt Water people. These are peoples living along the coastline and their waterways. 

For Millenia, First Nations people have camped and sung along the coastline. They gather near food, fish, turtles, birds, and plants. In summary, this painting tells the story of their journeys up and down the coast. 

Brittany Thompson of Civiq holding one of the aboriginal art (Blue Colours), created by Luke Penrith
Saltwater & The Coastline Aboriginal Art (Blue Colours)

Hills & Valleys Aboriginal Art (Green Colours) 

The green coloured artwork represents Mountain people, living in the hills, and the valleys across the country. They have a special place to maintain and connect to their country through the journey.  

Many animals live in the high country, and we pay our respects to their Elders both past, present, and emerging. 

Jack Adams of Civiq holding one of the aboriginal art (Green Colours), created by Luke Penrith
Hills & Valleys Aboriginal Art (Green Colours)

Selecting Aboriginal Art for your water station 

Does your school, council or development need a water station featuring Aboriginal art? Our team of experts can help you select the right water station for your community.  

Which way is up for this Aboriginal Art?  

Luke created art that is an aerial depiction of the land. There is no ‘right’ or ‘wrong’ way to hold a map. This means that you can hang Luke’s Aboriginal art any way you like! To explain this more, Luke creates art on a flat surface and works around the canvas. He has no preference which way the art is placed on the water station.  He just wants to see as many units out on the public as possible. Luke’s Aboriginal art is very versatile. And as a result, very suited to the many different stations we offer at Civiq.  

In summary,  all you need to do is choose which artwork to feature.  

Civiq staff holding the Aboriginal art, created by Luke Penrith for Civiq Drinking Fountain. From left to right: Gail Warrington, Naomi Ide and Kim Butler

What Aboriginal Art option will you choose for your drinking water station? 

  • Plains & Fresh Water Aboriginal Art (Earth colours) 
  • Saltwater & The Coastline Aboriginal Art (Blue Colours) 
  • Hills & Valleys Aboriginal Art (Green Colours) 
  • All of the above?  

 

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